Fitbit Increases Security Requirements, Mandates Google Login From 2023

Security

Wearable pioneer Fitbit has revealed a new clause that will require users to adopt a Google account for logins next year.

“In 2023 we plan to launch Google accounts on Fitbit, which will enable use of Fitbit with a Google account,” the company wrote in a blog post. “After the date of this launch, some uses of Fitbit will require a Google account.”

These will include signing up for a Fitbit, activating new Fitbit devices and features released after the launch of Google accounts on Fitbit, and activating certain Fitbit features incorporating Google products and services (e.g., Google Assistant on compatible devices).

The company also said that after the launch of Google accounts on Fitbit, users will have the option to move Fitbit to their Google account or to continue using Fitbit with their Fitbit account for as long as it is supported. 

“Google accounts on Fitbit will support a number of benefits for Fitbit users, including a single login for Fitbit and other Google services, industry–leading account security, centralized privacy controls for Fitbit user data, and more features from Google on Fitbit,” the company wrote.

To ease privacy concerns, Fitbit has also set up a page detailing its relationship with Google roughly two years after the tech giant’s acquisition. The document also clarifies that users’ personal information transferred by Fitbit to Google will not be used to serve ads.

“Support of Fitbit accounts will continue until at least the beginning of 2025. After support of Fitbit accounts ends, a Google account will be required to use Fitbit,” the company wrote.

The announcement comes months after Google reversed its recent decision to remove the app permissions list from the Google Play Store for Android.

More recently, the company launched a new program aimed at rewarding researchers that find bugs in its open source projects.

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